Browsing Tag

Project Garden

I Need Your DIY Advice…

Help my patio-1

We have reached the job in Project Garden of which I’m most terrified – laying a patio.

It will be going in this corner of the garden and as you can see there are already a few patio slabs around the drains by the wall. The washing line is going to be moved and the patio will come out in line with the wall and be a couple of fence panels long.

We’re hoping to do the bulk of the work on Saturday when the children are out with their grandparents – I hope it’s as sunny as it is today!

Now, I have the super-practical Mr Kat in charge of the operation but he has never laid a patio either.

So I’m throwing out a plea for you to give me your best advice for laying a patio – what do I need to know, what will cause us problems and how do we get it just right?

And yes, if it is even possible our garden is looking more untidy than when we began but at least our quince harvest is looking good.

With thanks to B&Q for supporting Project Garden as part of their Unloved Rooms initiative. For more information about this kind of post please read my disclosure for readers page. Kat xoxo

Read all of my Project Garden posts.

project garden

Naked Men in My Garden

David in the garden-1

As part of Project Garden pretty much our first job was to get rid of the naked men – makes sense, right?

It seems we’re not the only ones working on the garden this year. Our neighbours have been doing the same and in doing so have replaced their shed with a new shed, all good you’d think except the new shed left a gap at the end of the garden and our view turned in to this:

David in the garden-2

And yes, I am being kind.

Preferring a little freedom from naked (ok topless but really all the same) gardeners I decided we’d need some screening.

The wall separating our gardens is gorgeous and we have a jasmine well established at that end of the garden which had lost its footing when they changed sheds. We cut back the climber and reclaimed nearly two metres of garden space.

To keep the wall exposed we used trellis and to minimise flesh exposure we added in some brush screening, doubled over, until the jasmine takes hold again. The idea of using brush was to give the end of the garden a soft, organic feel rather than use more solid fencing.

housewifeconfidential-1

I am pleased with the outcome and although it’s not a complete barrier my garden is once again a naked-man-free zone.

Photoshop skillz learned at the school of Kitschy Coo, let’s not look too closely..

With thanks to B&Q for supporting Project Garden as part of their Unloved Rooms initiative. For more information about this kind of post please read my disclosure for readers page. Kat xoxo

Read all of my Project Garden posts.

project garden

Project Garden: Fence Painting

 fence before and after

Since we moved in this fence has been an odd bone of contention. By convention we are responsible for it yet our neighbour has claimed it as his and wouldn’t allow us to replace it.

Over the last six years it has fallen down every time we have a high wind and gradually become more hole than fence. During the Winter break the wind ripped so much of it apart we decided we would replace it and live with the consequences.

To our surprise, on the first day back to work in January a new fence turned up and was installed. Hooray! Although it was bright orange and the old fence posts were still in play. Boo! We had some privacy but it still fell down in a stiff breeze.

Phase one of sorting out the fence for the long-term is to paint the panels. It’s one of those jobs that seems like it’s going to take forever but when you get around to it it’s done in a couple of hours. It would have been faster if I hadn’t had to keep the children occupied – what is it with children and DIY?

We used B&Q’s Timbercare in Dark Brown (Monty thinks they should rename that to: chocolate). We’re fans of brown for fences as it gives you a rich backdrop colour whilst fading gently with age – do you agree? Luckily the pot was big as the fence on the other side is going to be replaced and painted too!

I made a time-lapse of us painting the fence – two hours down to thirty seconds of watching paint dry (and it dries quickly).

I’ll be doing a time-lapse of the shed being painted next if only the weather will hold for a day!

With thanks to B&Q for supporting Project Garden as part of their Unloved Rooms initiative. For more information about this kind of post please read my disclosure for readers page. Kat xoxo

Read all of my Project Garden posts.

project garden

Why I’m Not Inviting Anyone Over For Coffee

There are some things you think will never happen to you. But every time I look out of my window I’m confronted by the fact that my garden is one of those gardens.

You know the kind; the fences are falling down, the children have run riot and the former-lawn is peppered with decrepit plastic toys. I’m actually cringing telling you about it.

garden doom

It wasn’t always like this, times past we had it in good shape but bit by bit it has become unloved and ramshackle. It’s no one thing but an accumulation of neglect and a sand pit has brought us here.

housewifeconfidential-1

Why the sand pit you ask? Oh, let me tell you, you might think a sand pit is a fun addition to your garden. You may even sing its praises as your children play in it for hours on end but one day, one day the sand will find its way out of the pit. A little at first, then in big piles which, unchecked, kill off your lawn and provide cover for children to burrow beneath the turf. Step away from the sand pit purchase: no good will come.

housewifeconfidential-4

Our lawn used to be grassy and flat, now it’s muddy and undulating thanks to one particular child and his love of digging. Suffice to say; spades have been banned from the garden.

housewifeconfidential-5

So now you know the worst – my garden shame is public and that’s why I’m not inviting you over for coffee. Sorry.

In a fit of desperation I sent a picture of our pitiful back yard to B&Q with an equally pitiful email. Thankfully they have a sense of humour and agreed that it was time to get to work and reclaim the garden. They are helping us out with materials and we will be writing about our progress along the way.

garden of doom

Our first jobs are:

  • Remove the old raised beds.
  • Weed and cut back the climbers.
  • Fix up the fences.
  • Paint the fences and the shed.

Too much for one bank holiday? Let’s hope not!

housewifeconfidential-3

With thanks to B&Q for supporting Project Garden as part of their Unloved Rooms initiative. For more information about this kind of post please read my disclosure for readers page. Kat xoxo

Read all of my Project Garden posts.

project garden